OIL PAINTING BLISS - "HAUGHTY APHRODITE"

I've really been reaching in all creative directions lately, suddenly being taken by a large appetite to MAKE things.  I've always had that in me, but lately it's ballooned, as if to make up for years of ignoring that appetite.  One of the big things on my list has been to fill up some wall space, specifically with oil painting... more specifically, my own oil painting.  I've had a 20x30 canvas collecting dust for a year now, originally purchased to go above my bed, planned to be covered in a dashing arrangement of paints that I still have yet to totally plan out.  A whole year!

Maybe 20x30 was too ambitious to start out with after not picking up a paintbrush in a sadly large number of years.  This 10x10 canvas seemed more approachable, so I sat down at 5pm one night in August and had at it.  What fun!  I was completely absorbed, and didn't even look at the clock until midnight.  I forgot how amazing that feels, and vow to do it again.  And again.  I finally tore myself away at 2am, only to wake up and jump right back to it for a couple of hours, six hours later.  "Starving artist hours," as my mother put it (rest assured, I have plenty to eat in my kitchen).  Here's what came out of it:

"Haughty Aphrodite"

"Haughty Aphrodite"

What a sense of calm it gave me to dive back into something that I love so dearly.  It was a poignant reminder that I need to spend more time doing things that I want to do, and stop putting them off because "I'm too busy."  I know you know what I mean!  So, do yourself a solid favor, and go do something you've been putting off for a while (that you WANT to do).  And if you're one of those amazing people that have figured out how to plug such a thing into your busy schedule on a regular, or semi-regular basis, hopefully you'll share some inspiration on how you do it.  

Either way, meet "Haughty Aphrodite."  She started off as a simple practice painting of the Aphrodite of Milos statue that's in the Louvre, but while I was working on the shadows of her nose, I saw a glimmer of a sneer that had formed out of the brush stroke.  So, I went for it and finished off that sneer.  Then,  I  reworked her mouth (long live oil paint!) to match the expression, and then painted in an arm so she could throw some attitude with that hands-on-hip pose.  It made me want to know, even more, what her original two arms looked like.  Any hypotheses?